Yves KLEIN

“The imagination is the vehicle of sensibility. Transported by the imagination, we attain life, life itself, which is absolute art.”

Yves Klein was the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. But the success of his sadly short-lived career lay in attacking many of the ideas that underpinned the abstract painting that had been dominant in France since the end of the Second World War.

Throughout Klein’s work, from his canvas monochromes to his later performances, there is a stress on immediate experience that reflects aspects of the Performance art movement of the 1960s. Although he was never specifically opposed to creating art objects, many of Klein’s later works seem to want to abandon the object as a vehicle for art and instead find ways to more directly transmit ideas and experiences.